ENVIRONMENT YUKON






 

Planning

Regional land use plans

 

Significance

 

Developing long-term land use plans through public processes helps governments recognize and balance competing views about how lands and natural resources should be used.

 

Plans support effective land and resource management and are important obligations arising from Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. Chapter 11 of the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements established the regional land use planning process and represents a commitment by the governments to conduct regional land use planning in Yukon. Through land use planning, a regional commission appointed by Yukon and First Nation governments prepares a regional land use plan in consultation with First Nations, stakeholders and residents. The plans are approved by Yukon and First Nation governments and guide the future use and sustainable development of land in the planning region.


Regional planning is intended to reflect the traditional knowledge, experience and recommendations of residents, as well as incorporate science and broad socio-economic and environmental interests.

 

What is happening?

 

The Yukon Land Use Planning Council has proposed seven planning regions in Yukon. See interactive map and table below.

  • One regional plan, the North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan, has been completed in 2009 and is being implemented.
  • No other regional land use planning processes are currently underway in Yukon. Various projects by the Yukon Land Use Planning Council are underway to lend clarity to how regional land use planning will be conducted in the future.

 

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Regional Land Use Plans Status  
Dawson On Hold

The Dawson Planning Commission produced and consulted on a Resource Assessment Report and Plan Alternatives.


In December 2014, the Yukon government, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, and Tr’ondek Hwech’in (the Parties) agreed to pause the Dawson planning process until the litigation regarding the Peel Watershed regional land use plan has concluded, and the Parties agree to a path forward for planning in the Dawson region.

North Yukon Current 2009 In 2009, the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation and Yukon government approved the North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan. It provides a sustainable development framework for land management, while addressing the key issues of oil and gas development in Porcupine caribou herd habitat and development impacts in wetlands. The plan also recommends protected area status for the Whitefish Wetlands and the Summit Lake-Bell River area. It identifies important traditional use and wildlife areas that were mapped from local and traditional knowledge.
Peel Watershed On Hold

Land use planning began for the Peel watershed in 2004 and the planning commission produced a recommended land use plan in 2011. The process is currently on hold while awaiting the outcome of a supreme court hearing on the plan. A staking moratorium across the Peel Watershed regional land use planning Region has been in place since during the planning process, which expires on January 1, 2018.


Land use planning will continue for the Peel Watershed region once the final outcome from the Peel court challenge is known and the Parties agree on a path forward.

Teslin On Hold A previous planning process for the Teslin region was suspended in 2004 before a Draft Plan was produced. In September 2011, the Yukon Land Use Planning Council recommended the Teslin Region as a priority planning region and work has begun on a Terms of Reference for a planning commission but is on hold until the outcome of the Peel watershed case is known.
Northern Tutchone Not Started Planning in this region has not been initiated.
Kluane On Hold In September 2011, the Yukon Land Use Planning Council recommended the Kluane Region as a priority planning region and preliminary work has begun on a Terms of Reference for a planning commission but is on hold until the outcome of the Peel watershed case is known.
Whitehorse Not Started Planning in this region has not been initiated.
White River N/A Regional planning as envisioned under the Umbrella Final Agreement does not apply to White River as White River First Nation does not have a Final Agreement.
North Slope N/A The Yukon North Slope is part of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. As such, the provisions set out in the Inuvialuit Final Agreement speak to how land use planning processes are to be undertaken. The Final Agreement provides for the Inuvialuit to be effectively involved in all bodies, functions, and decisions pertaining to land and wildlife management in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region.

Kaska N/A Regional planning as envisioned under the Umbrella Final Agreement does not apply to asserted Kaska traditional territory, as Kaska does not have a Final Agreement.