ENVIRONMENT YUKON






 

Planning

Species management plans

 

Significance

Species management plans address conservation or population management concerns for fish or wildlife populations. They are used to help to develop or revise approaches to managing a population and regulating human interaction with these species.

Management plans are developed in response to local or territorial population management needs or as required through the federal species at risk legislation. Tracking the implementation of management plans helps to demonstrate commitment to continued action on managing species.

Aishihik wood bison.

 

What is happening?

The Yukon government has the following species management plans in place or in progress:

 

Plan Approved Status Summary
Management Plan for Elk in Yukon 2016 Current This plan provides an adaptive framework to guide the management of the Takhini and Braeburn elk herds.
Mandanna Lake Management Plan 2013 Current This plan was approved in 2003 as a requirement from the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final Agreement. The plan was reviewed and updated in 2013. The plan guides the conservation of freshwater fish and the respect for traditional and current uses of the lake.
Management Plan for Yukon Amphibians 2013 Current This plan provides a broad framework guiding the management of amphibians in Yukon. The Western Toad is listed as a Species of Special Concern under the federal Species at Risk Act.
Management Plan for the Aishihik Wood Bison Herd in Southwestern Yukon 2012 Current This plan provides a broad framework guiding the management of the herd in a manner consistent with recovery of a species at risk, while addressing local concerns and interests.
Yukon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan 2012 Current This plan guides wolf conservation and management throughout Yukon, ensuring that the roles of wolves and their prey species are respected.
Dezadeash Lake Management Plan No Underway This plan guides management of fish populations and their habitat at Dezadeash Lakes. The plan is being developed in partnership with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Alsek Renewable Resource Council, and the Government of Yukon.
Grizzly Bear Conservation and Management Plan No Underway The Government of Yukon and the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board are working in partnership to develop this plan to address local management issues and to meet federal and international obligations.

 

The federal government has the following recovery strategies and management plans in place or in progress:

 

Recovery Strategy (in place)

Baikal Sedge

Eskimo Curlew

Northern Mountain Caribou

Wood Bison

Little Brown Myotis and Northern Myotis

Management Plan (in place)

Short Eared Owl

Rusty Blackbird

Peregrine Falcon

Recovery Strategy (in progress)

Common Nighthawk

Olive Sided Flycatcher

Red Knot roselaari type

Management Plan (in progress)

Polar Bear

 

The Management Plan for Yukon Amphibians, Management Plan for the Aishihik Wood Bison Herd in Southwestern Yukon, and the Grizzly Bear Conservation and Management Plan were developed in part to address the national requirements under the federal Species at Risk Act.

 

Taking action

View the species management plans.

 

Wolves play an important role in Yukon’s ecosystems.

Profile

Grizzly Bear Conservation and Management Plan

 

Female grizzly. Angela Milani.

 

The Yukon government is working in partnership with the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board to develop a Grizzly Bear Conservation and Management Plan for Yukon.

Grizzly bears are nationally assessed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) as Special Concern. Once listed in the federal Species at Risk Act, a management plan for the species across Canada will be required. The Yukon Grizzly Bear Conservation and Management Plan will provide important Yukon-specific context and guidance to support the development of a national plan for grizzly bears and it will inform decisions related to grizzly bear conservation and management in Yukon.

The management plan will consider all aspects of grizzly bear conservation and management with particular focus on habitat and land use issues, hunting and harvest management (including hunting of grizzly bears along roadsides), reducing conflicts between grizzly bears and humans, wildlife viewing and tourism values, and improving our understanding of grizzly bear populations and ecology.


The management plan will provide overarching strategic direction for addressing the range of values and issues related to grizzly bear conservation and management across Yukon. Although local or regulatory issues will not be specifically addressed in the plan, it may contain related recommendations.


The working group is engaging First Nations, Inuvialuit, boards and councils, non-governmental organizations, interest groups, and the public to gather Yukon’s collective knowledge and wisdom about grizzly bears, and will integrate use local, traditional and scientific knowledge to develop the management plan.


Female grizzly with cubs. Angela Milani.